Every trade has its tricks and painting is no exception, so armed with useful techniques, right choice of tool and procedures for preparing surfaces, almost anyone can accomplish the job with a professional finish.

PAINT BRUSHES

Paint brushes are available in various sizes mostly, ¾”  to 6″ and these can be further categorised into three groups:-

  1. SMALL AREAS – (Grills, Trims, Furniture) – ¾” to 1-1/2″
  2. MEDIUM AREAS – (Trims, Doors, Windows, Cutting in) – 2″ to 3″
  3. LARGE AREAS ( Walls, Ceilings ) – 4″ to 6″

This categorisation is not absolute and overlapping will occur in some areas but using this guide as a reference should yield the best results.

The Bristles of a typical paintbrush are frayed or split at the working end to increase surface tension and hold as much paint as possible. At the other end, they are embedded in epoxy resin,  which is further anchored to the brush handle by a metal band called a ferrule.  A wedge (spacer) is inserted between the bristles at the base during construction which creates a well to help in holding more paint and creates a thick, springy and wedge like brush edge.

 

 

 

 

PAINT ROLLERS

FLEETWOOD ROLLER SLEEVES are available in DIY – 3/8″ pile, Standard ¾” pile and Deep Pile 1-1/4″ pile.  These rollers are suitable for most large area painting jobs and the right roller (nap) for the job will be outlined following.

It must be noted that a good “Medium Area” paintbrush will be required to assist a roller in painting a room.  The paintbrush will be needed to cut in or fill in the corners which the roller may not be able to reach.

STRUCTURE OF A ROLLER

Rollers consist of a cover (sleeve) and a  Frame, they are usually sold separately.

Fleetwood roller covers (Sleeves), is made of polyester/nylon blend, wool or other synthetic fibres, which is wound around and bonded to a central plastic core in a variety of nap (pile) lengths as shown by the diagram below.

The frame has a spring cage that holds the cover(Sleeve) firmly in place: Plastic bearings at each end of the frame allow the sleeve to roll smoothly.

To reach ceilings and high walls without standing on a ladder, the Fleetwood Telescopic Roller which extends to 3ft. comes in handy for these situations. For much taller areas, one could screw a telescopic extension pole into the handle’s threaded end to reach the desired height.

CHOOSING A ROLLER NAP

Roller covers are available in three kinds of nap (pile): Short, Medium and Long.

SHORT NAP, about ¼” – 3/8″ deep, holds less paint than the others but leaves a thin, smooth coating that is ideal for smooth surfaces and may even be used with gloss paint. (Note well – “may even be used”…  Never roll on a second coat of gloss paint before the first coat has set  –  the unset paint will pick the nap from the roller and destroy the job)

THERE EXISTS, VERY SHORT PILE MOHAIR ROLLER FABRIC BEST SUITED FOR APPLYING OIL BASED PAINT.

MEDIUM PILE  usually ¾” deep, holds paint well and produces a softly stippled effect. It is good for medium or semi-smooth surfaces.

LONG NAP (PILE) from 1″ to 1-1/4″ deep is good for working a thick coat of paint into textured (rough) or porous surfaces and may leave behind deep stipples in the paint when used with thick paint on smooth surfaces. Roller (covers) sleeves need no special preparation under normal circumstances and can be used straight from the pack.

BASIC BRUSHWORK

LOAD THE BRUSH

This technique will help to prevent overloading and reduces the likelihood that paint will run under the ferrule, where dried paint can ruin the brush.

* Dip the bristles into the paint no more than halfway.

* Tap the ferrule gently against the rim of the paint container or gently tap the bristles against the side of the container to remove excess paint.

Do not wipe the brush across the container rim; Doing so removes too much paint.

 

 

PAINTING BY SECTIONS

Technique to apply the paint is to gently lay the bristles of the loaded brush unto the surface and apply an even stroke then lay it off by gently removing the brush from the surface. “Lay it on, Lay It off”. 

Cover a large surface in sections, each about two brush widths across and two bristle lengths long. With slow-drying paints, you can experiment with painting larger sections.

* Paint the first section, using up-and-down strokes combined with the feathering technique of Laying on and laying off

* Then move to an adjacent section, working toward and into the completed area of wet paint (above)

 

 

GUARDING AS YOU GO ALONG

A metal or plastic paint shield or a firm piece of cardboard protects surfaces you do not want painted.

* Hold the edge of the shield against the surface you want to protect. If there is a gap at the boundary, such as often occurs between walls and baseboards or walls and carpets, gently push the shield into it.

* While holding the paint shield in place with one hand, paint along the length of   the shield with the other hand (See above Image)

* Remove the shield and wipe it clean. Move to the next section and reposition the shield.

LOADING THE ROLLER

DISTRIBUTE THE PAINT EVENLY * Fill the tray well halfway with paint. 

* Dip the roller in the paint, then roll it down the sloped grating, stopping short of the paint in the well. Repeat this procedure two or three times.

* Dip The Roller into the paint once more and roll and lift,.. roll and lift it on the grating until the nap has been evenly saturated.

 

 

N.B.: REMEMBER TO CUT IN CORNERS WITH A MEDIUM SIZED PAINT BRUSH BEFORE PROCEEDING TO ROLL OUT PAINT. as shown below

 BEGIN WITH A ZIGZAG (“M” or ” W”) 

TO BEGIN A WALL OR CEILING SECTION

When painting with a roller, always make the first stroke away from you.

* To paint a ceiling, begin at a corner, about 3 ft. away from one wall and overlapping the cut in strip on the adjacent wall.

* Without lowering the roller from the ceiling make more strokes – alternately towards and away from you – to form the letter “W” about 3ft square in size. (See above left diagram)

* If you were painting a wall, you would push  the roller upward on the first stroke and then complete the “M” pattern  (Above Centre)

TO COMPLETE THE SECTION

Fill in the “W” or “M” pattern with criss-crossing strokes of the roller without lifting it from the surface.  Use even pressure to avoid bubbles and blotches, stop when the entire section is evenly covered with paint.

Reload The roller with paint, then repeat the preceding two-step sequence into the next section until completed.